“I Make Lists on My Phone” a Poem by Christine Bode

I Make Lists on My Phone

by Christine Bode

I make lists on my phone –
notes from Brené Brown’s books,
my personal shame inventory,
favourite TV shows,
who I consider myself to be,
my top 50 books,
what I want for my life,
ideas for poems about COVID-19,
affirmations,
qualities had by the guy of my dreams,
men I can remember sleeping with,
what’s important to me,
recipes, quotes,
psychic medium readings,
parks to visit for nature walks,
friends who awoke,
Christmas card recipients,
how to control emotions before a full moon,
people in my life I value and miss,
ideas for courses,
films by Jim Jarmusch, and
my bucket list.
I make lists on my phone –
that’s all you need to know.

Learn more about my first book of poetry, Eden Refugee, here. If you know anyone who would enjoy it, please share.

“Become the Observer,” a New Poem by Christine Bode

Become the Observer

A new poem by ©Christine Bode 2021

This seeker is an empath;
a truth seeker,
always striving for more
knowledge and understanding
of a world
she’s been at war with—
in her mind—more lately
than ever before;
searching for something that will
give her faith in God,
hope for the future,
relief from grief.
At 57 years of age,
she finally realizes
that the truth has always
been within. All she
needed to do
was listen closely
and start over again.
Become the observer,
step outside of external dramas,
go inside her heart,
become neutral and
let her higher self show her
the right moment
to stop fighting, and
to help others.
The secret is
there is no absolute truth;
everything in the universe
is permitted as part
of its evolution. When we
become the observer,
we enter the eye of the storm,
connect with our hearts,
and therein we find
love and harmony.
There is well-being in
our shadow selves,
so no need to ignore
as the body operates in tandem
with the subconscious mind.
There is peace in silence,
and when the noise of humanity
invades the quiet,
nature and sound healing
help seal the cracks.
Don’t take life too seriously;
enjoy the journey,
dream big,
love yourself,
follow your interests, and
LET GO of anything else
that doesn’t resonate.
You are all that and
a bag of chips—
you are the observer,
the great I AM.

4 Benefits of Being Part of an Anthology

21 Resilient Women and Beyond the Smile Anthologies

There is a saying that sometimes you need to get your feet wet before you jump in the water.

Many writers who want to publish a book, take their first step by writing one chapter in a compilation of stories called an anthology.

What is an Anthology?

An anthology book is a collection of short fiction, poetry or nonfiction works (or excerpts) by a variety of authors. Typically, the book is organized around a particular subject, theme, writing style or genre.

One of the most successful anthology book series has been the Chicken Soup for the Soul series by Jack Canfield and Mark Victor Hansen.

Each book in the series is a collection of inspirational stories targeted at various markets such as pet lovers, cancer patients, nurses, new moms, runners, gardeners—the list is exhaustive.

Participation in an anthology can be by invitation for free, for pay (share of royalties or flat fee) or pay to participate, meaning that authors pay to be included in the book. In the business arena, paid anthologies are common since authors use the opportunity to promote themselves. Some projects also require authors to purchase a certain number of books either in addition to any fee or in lieu of a fee.

Authors are provided with a list of guidelines for writing and submitting drafts for their segments of the book.

The compiler or publisher bears the costs of producing the book to include editing, graphic design, layout, proofing, publishing, printing, marketing, and distribution, and retains the right to reject any author’s submission or participation in the project.

4 Benefits of Being Part of an Anthology

Less effort: Self-publishing or getting published by a regular publishing house can be quite a project! An anthology only requires authors to submit a segment and leave those details to the editor and publisher. This allows authors to concentrate on creating their best work.

Less cost: Depending on the nature of the anthology agreement, a writer can purchase books instead of a fee or pay a small participation fee which is a fraction of the cost of self-publishing. The compiler of the anthology picks up the tab for editing, design, cover design, proofreading, distribution, and launch.

In good company: Some anthologies gather top authors and experts. So, being included with recognized writers can afford less famous writers the benefit of being considered on par with them.

Today’s business card. Being able to say, “I’m one of the authors of _____” can carry a lot of weight for writers who are seeking additional writing opportunities. The book becomes a great business card! It says that someone of note considered them and their work worthy to be included.

The contacts you make can lead to a larger marketing pool. The other authors are going to market the anthology to their readers. This essentially means you get free marketing to a different audience simply because your work is compiled in the same place. It also means you might be able to market a little less than you do for your singular works because several people will be sharing this information. (No need to overdo the marketing and make readers tired of the promo.)

Here are some recent Anthology Projects we managed.

Dawn James
Managing Director, Publish and Promote
1.888.767.8423

Too Close to Heaven: A Poem by Christine Bode for Those Suffering With Their Mental Health

Circle of Angels in Dante’s Paradise by Gustave Dore

Do you or someone you know feel as if you’re getting too close to heaven? Do you feel that life is unbearable on this crazy blue planet and that you don’t know how much longer you can live here? I have felt that way too, I assure you.

Acutely aware that an innumerable amount of people has lost someone they love during this pandemic, from either the virus, because they couldn’t get the medical care they needed, or because they took their own life, I am thinking of you today and wanted to share a poem that I wrote years ago for a friend of mine who took his life. The poem was inspired by the song “Too Close to Heaven” by The Waterboys which you can hear in the stunningly beautiful and powerful video below, posted by deep46blue on YouTube.

If you know of someone who is struggling with their mental health right now, please reach out to The Centre for Addiction and Mental Health (CAMH) for advice on how you can help them. Their toll-free number is 1-800-463-2338.

TOO CLOSE TO HEAVEN

by Christine Bode

You are the brother I never had
Seeing your pain made me so sad
Grateful for every moment we spent
Knowing everything that I said I meant

All the love
All the laughter
Every joy
Every game

You’re too close to heaven to worry about shame

I miss you more than you’ll ever know
Every road travelled has led us here
If I had my way I would go before
I’ll try my best not to need you near

All the raging
All the mud
Every river
Every flood

You’re too close to heaven to worry about blood

Will you ask God when you see him
If he will help me bear your loss
Tell him I am pissed off that
he didn’t pick some other sod

All the stress
All the fright
Every vow
Every tear

You’re too close to heaven to worry about fear

I’ll ask God when he’s listening
to take care of your soul
I’ll ask him for understanding
in this forbidding vicious world

All the past
All the future
Every hope
Every strife

You’re too close to heaven to worry about life

deep46blue